Uni Multigenre Examples


Many Uni Teachers are using multi-genre tools in a variety of ways in their teaching. Check back here to see examples, or send examples to our library assistant at larson40@illinois.edu. You can also join this wiki and add to it yourself. Create a wiki account and request to join this wiki.

Tech Workshop Presentation




To get a copy of the handout from the session, email larson40@illinois.edu.


Lausanne Laptop Institute 2012 Notes


Here are notes taken by Janet Morford in several sessions at the LLI, July 2012.
MKA = Montclair Kimberley Academy, the spotlight school of LLI 12
URLs for presentation materials are generally given in the heading of each set of notes.





More notes from the laptop institute 2012 from Beth Westfall


Here is a brief bibliography, not in any correct format, of articles dealing with the current research of the use of 1:1 computers on learning.

Effects on Teachers

Dwyer, D. C., Ringstaff, C., & Sandholtz, J. H. (1991). Changes in teachers' beliefs and practices in technology- rich classrooms. Educational Leadership, 48(8), 45-52.

Windschitl, M., & Sahl, K. (2002).Tracing teachers' use of technology in a laptop computer school:The interplay of teacher beliefs, social dynamics, and institutional culture. American Educational Research Journal, 39(1), 165-205.

Burns, K., & Polman, J. (2006).The impact of ubiquitous computing in the Internet age: How middle school teachers integrated wireless laptops in the initial stages of implementation. Journal ofTechnology andTeacher Education, 14(2), 363-385.

Garthwait, A., & Weller, H. G. (2005).A year in the life:Two seventh grade teachers implement one-to-one computing. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 37(4), 361-377.

Silvernail, D., & Lane, D. (2004). The Impact of Maine's one-to- one laptop program on middle school teachers and students: Phase one summary evidence. Maine Education Policy Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.bryan.k12.oh.us/Form s/MLTIPhaseOne.pdf.

Swan, K., Kratcoski,A., Mazzer, P., & Schenker, J. (2005). Bringing Mohamed to the mountain: Situated professional development in a ubiquitous computing classroom. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 32(4), 353-365.

Changes in the Classroom Environment

Rockman et al. (1998). Powerful tools for schooling: Second year study of the laptop program. A project for Anytime Anywhere Learning by Microsoft Corporation & Notebooks for Schools by Toshiba American Information Systems. Project Report. San Francisco, CA.

Russell, M., Bebell, D., & Higgins, J. (2004).Laptop learning:A comparison of teaching and learning in upper elementary classrooms equipped with shared carts of laptops and permanent 1:1 laptops. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 30(4), 313-330.

Dunleavy, M., Dexter, S., & Heinecke,W. F. (2007).What added value does a 1:1 student to laptop ratio bring to technology-supported teaching and learning? Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 23(5), 440-452.

Swan, K.,Van 'T Hooft, M., Kratcoski,A., & Schenker, J. (2007). Ubiquitous computing and changing pedagogical possibilities: Representations, conceptualizations and uses of knowledge. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 36(4), 481-515.

Rockman, S. (2007). It's my laptop. Threshold, 4(4), 21- 25.

Windschitl, M., & Sahl, K. (2002).Tracing teachers' use of technology in a laptop computer school: The interplay of teacher beliefs, social dynamics, and institutional culture. American Educational Research Journal, 39(1), 165- 205.

Impact on Student Learning

Mitchell Institute. (2004). One-to-one laptops in a high school environment: Piscataquis Community High School study final report. Portland, ME: Mitchell Institute. Retrieved November 24, 2007 from http://www.mitchellinstitute.org/Gates/p df/One-to-One_Laptops_Report.pdf.

Silvernail, D., & Lane, D. (2004).The Impact of Maine's one-to-one laptop program on middle school teachers and students: Phase one summary evidence. Maine Education Policy Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.bryan.k12.oh.us/Forms/MLTI PhaseOne.pdf.

Bebell, D. (2005).Technology promoting student excellence:An investigation of the first year of 1:1 computing in New Hampshire middle schools. Boston, MA:Technology and Assessment Study Collaborative, Boston College.

Russell, M., Bebell, D., & Higgins, J. (2004). Laptop learning:A comparison of teaching and learning in upper elementary classrooms equipped with shared carts of laptops and permanent 1:1 laptops. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 30(4), 313- 330.

Key Literature
Penuel,W. (2006). Implementation and effects of one-to-one computing initiatives:A research synthesis. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 38(3), 329.

Rockman, et al. (1997). Report of a laptop program pilot:A project for anytime anywhere learning by Microsoft Corporation, notebooks for schools by Toshiba America Information Systems. Rockman et al: San Francisco, CA

Rockman, et al. (2000).A more complex picture: Laptops use and impact in the context of changing home and school access. San Francisco, CA: Rockman et al.

Warschauer, M. (2006). Laptops and literacy: Learning in the wireless classroom. New York:Teachers College Press

Wenglinsky, H. (2006).Technology and achievement:The bottom line. Educational Leadership, 63(4), 29-32.

Zucker, A. (2004). Developing a research agenda for ubiquitous computing in schools. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 30(4), 371-386.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOU?
Academic Student Learning Outcomes
Deeper understanding of content
Wider breadth of content knowledge
Integration of content areas
Greater relevancy of learning
Improved capacity for learning
Increased ability to process information
Teacher centric
Creative vs. Consumptive learning
Non-Academic Student Learning Outcomes
Technology proficiency
Attainment of Internet safety skills
Communication media aptitude
Improved communication quality
Community development
Responsibility